Invasive Plant Management

Invasive plants are those which have typically been introduced from other parts of the world which, lacking any natural control, spread aggressively through our landscapes, out-compete native populations and ultimately reduce biodiversity. Understanding the direct correlation between biodiversity and ecosystem health, the establishment and subsequent proliferation of these invasive plants, pose serious threats to maintaining healthy ecosystem functions including provison of habitat, stormwater mitigation, and erosion control among others.

While some species are easily recognizable in their ability to form dense stands like multiflora rose and bamboo species, others continue to be promoted and distributed by ignorant or irresponsible landscape contractors and garden centers as valuable ornamental plants. Species, including Japanese Barberry (Berberis thunbergii), Burning Bush (Euonymus alatus), Butterfly Bush, (Buddleia sp.), Doublefile Viburnum (Viburnum plicatum) and Japanese ornamental grasses (ie. Miscanthus sp.) among others, which are often marketed to possess coveted aesthetic attributes are also escaping from their intended planting areas to adjacent lands where they compromise native plant communities.

For more information regarding invasive species and their effects in the landscape, please visit the PA DCNR website.

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